5 Science Park Drive, Singapore

5 Science Park Drive, Singapore

5 Science Park Drive, Cluster 1,  Singapore   5 Science Park Drive is the latest building in Singapore’s Science Park, Asia’s leading R&D and technology location done in collaboration with Serie Architects, London. Officially opened by Deputy Prime Minister Heng Swee Keat, 5SPD re-works the model for a technology building to reflect the needs of emerging e-commerce and research organisations.  This flagship building will form the basis of the re-development of Science Park Cluster 1. The Science Park model of the 1990s, with buildings isolated from one another by under-utilized landscape is no longer adequate for today’s workspaces that are more social in nature. The first of more than five buildings in the cluster, 5SPD is designed to ensure that common spaces are visible, accessible and nourished with amenities. The building features a three-storey extended lobby or ‘city room’ that incorporates a series of cascading platforms incorporating a café, break-out spaces and a small auditorium.  This space is focused on collaboration, discussion and networking. The floor plans are designed to maximise flexibility.  A typical floorplate has over 4,000sqm in open plan space and column-free spans of 20 metres.  Centralized circulation with highly efficient double-loaded corridors allows the building to be configured for single or multi-tenant use. The façade features high performance glazing set into an alternating ‘accordion’ design that is animated at night with a re-programmable LED light system.  The design combines vision and spandrel glazing to maximise views while mitigating solar gain. The adjacent car park has been covered with extensive landscaping and amenities including exercise pavilions.  This will eventually form a shared park for a cluster of...
NUS School of Design & Environment, Singapore

NUS School of Design & Environment, Singapore

NUS School of Design & Environment, Singapore   Inspired by the traditional language of tropical architecture, SDE is designed to be a net zero energy building. In the tropics, the challenge of energy efficiency is essentially mitigating the force of the sun by both shade and ventilation. For this reason, vernacular architecture in the tropics have used an architectural language of open platforms. These platforms form space for occupation, create shade from the sun and with a lack of emphasis on solid walls facilitates natural ventilation. Beyond this functional requirement, the building seeks to create a symbolic architectural presence with its zero carbon target intended to be a model example to inspire students and practitioners. In recognition of tropical architectural precedents, the proposal starts not with the definition of enclosed spaces but with a series of raised horizontal planes. These planes are loosely stacked and configured to facilitate a range of different activities. Each plane is extended horizontally to provide shade for the space below. Glazing that can be completely folded open and uninterrupted internal spaces facilitate excellent natural ventilation. Uniting these various planes into an architectural whole is a spectacular over-sailing roof which shades the whole building. The surface of the roof is in essence a piece of raised ground thickened at the centre to absorb trees and other greenery. Photovoltaic cells arrayed along the edge of the roof support on-site energy generation and other programs including an open air theatre and a small construction test bed supporting the school’s research agenda. One of the challenges was to create shelter to mitigate the morning and early evening sun...
One Pearl Bank, Singapore

One Pearl Bank, Singapore

One Pearl Bank, Singapore   One Pearl Bank was officially launched on July 2019. The two 39-storey arc-shaped towers will replace the horseshoe form Pearl Bank Apartments built in the early 1970s.  In line with Singapore’s goal of increasing downtown housing density, the new towers allow an increase from 272 to 774 apartments. Positioned on a prominent site on Pearl’s Hill, the towers are conceived as beacons for the city.  This role is emphasised by the towers’ extended roof crown that is brightly lit in the evening. The towers feature a world-first; a series of ‘sky allotments’ arrayed vertically.  Placed every four storeys, the 18 sky allotment gardens include almost 200 individual plots allowing residents to cultivate home-grown produce.  One of the social ambitions of the project is that the shared endeavour of the gardening will play a role in fostering communal life within each tower. The sky allotments are complemented by extensive landscaping and planting – with over 500 trees from 35 species which includes mid-tower sky terraces and lushly planted roof gardens. The towers are linked at roof level by two dramatic arc-shaped bridges that establish a continuous social space across the two towers. The towers themselves are formed from gently curving arcs that optimise views across the city.  Apartments feature generous balconies many with sunken planters.  Balconies are positioned within a double-skin system that allows for variation and difference within a coherent gridded façade. At ground level, the ambition of the design is to help revive interest in the adjacent Pearl’s Hill City Park.  Located at the end of the steep terrain, Pearl’s Hill City Park...
New State Courts Complex, Singapore

New State Courts Complex, Singapore

New State Courts Complex, Singapore   The Singapore State Courts includes the construction of two new 150m high towers and the renovation of the existing Octagon courts building in collaboration with Serie Architects. One of the towers accommodates 60 criminal courtrooms while the other houses the judges’ chambers and supporting functions. The existing octagon courts building, built in the 1970s, will be refurbished and will house the civil, family and juvenile courts. The relationship between the city and its civic buildings was the primary interest for the project with the new courts complex building symbolically open and accessible to the public. The courtroom tower is therefore designed as an open frame supporting a series of shared terraces on which the courtrooms are placed. It has no external facade. In a metaphorical sense, this represents the openness and impartiality of the judicial process. The new towers are then linked by a series of foot bridges that enable the controlled circulation necessary for the courtroom process. Outdoor terraces feature high rise gardens and are designed to allow views across the city thereby reinforcing the civic role of the building. The gardens will also play an important role in filtering tropical sun. Taking the language drawn from the city, the courtrooms are clad in ribbed terracotta which reflects the colours of the tiled roofs in the adjacent historic Chinatown shop-houses which can be readily understood by all Singaporeans. The project won via an open design competition jury was lead by internationally acclaimed architect Moshe Safdie. In a joint statement, the judges praised the ‘simple but dignified’ design which ‘complements the conserved octagon...
Oasis Terraces – Punggol Neighbourhood Centre and Polyclinic

Oasis Terraces – Punggol Neighbourhood Centre and Polyclinic

Oasis Terraces, Punggol Singapore     The project, developed by Singapore’s Housing & Development Board (HDB), with Ministry of Health (MOH) as the joint stake holder, provides retail, dining and healthcare facilities for HDB’s residents in Punggol. The 27400 sqm project, dubbed ‘Oasis Terrace’ is an integrated development that brings together communal amenities and services in land scarce Singapore which includes communal gardens, play spaces, gyms, retail spaces, dining, learning spaces and 9400 sqm of healthcare facilities. The proposal is a demonstration in architectural form of one of the key visions for Punggol; the close integration of community and landscape. The design achieves this through the successive framing of community spaces with garden elements. For instance, the community plaza at the heart of the scheme is framed by a series of lush garden terraces sloping towards the waterway. This in turn is framed by a porous perimeter of platforms holding a variety of community functions and flora. The gardens will play more than just an aesthetic role in the community. They will be a horticultural project, bringing residents together to plant, maintain and enjoy them, nourishing community bonds. Ramps connect these gardens and terraces providing green and generous circulation routes up the building. Food courts, cafes and shops spill out onto the terraces where family activities also take place. Overlooking the communal gardens on the platforms are rooms and outdoor areas for communal dining, restaurants, education centres, and polyclinic rooms. The design is conceived as a light and open frame that captures and accommodates the diverse programmes for the community, allowing communal life to unfold in. Therefore, the architecture...